Ode to a Hunting Partner

 Written by Neal Brodbeck 9/23/2009

 

In July of 2009, Seguin lost a great community leader as well a dedicated son, father, brother, and friend.  Many will always remember Scott Roessing for his love of family and our community; however, I am one of the fortunate and privileged few that experienced Scott’s love of the outdoors.  For the past 27 years, Scott and I enjoyed many wonderful hunting and fishing outings.  All outdoor enthusiasts understand the passion and drive for hunting and fishing, and Scott was no exception. 


            Obviously, there are countless stories and memories of our hunting and fishing excursions.  One fond recollection involves the Hill Country and a little known fact about Scott – his bullets had a way of missing the mark.  After placing him in a tree stand that was sure to produce results, I moved to the other side of the ranch.  Shortly after settling into my stand, the first shot rang out.  Anxiousness caused me to end the hunt early.  As I arrived, Scott was on the ground below the tree stand, his head was down, and looking for what I hoped were signs of success.  As I approached, it was obvious the situation was not good – Scott was picking up live rounds of ammunition.  The first shot at a nice buck was a clean miss.  As Scott attempted to reload for another, he accidentally opened the bottom of the clip, spilling his remaining bullets.  As tears of laughter were wiped away, we looked up and saw the buck slipping over the next ridge.

 

All hunting stories usually involve food.  Scott was not an early riser, a trait which benefited those that hunted with him.  If he slept in, we knew a traditional ranch breakfast would be waiting on the table.  I can still smell the bacon while driving up to the house after the morning hunt.

 

            Most of our hunting memories over the past ten years were shared on the Schumann Ranch, about fifteen miles south of Jourdanton.  The time we spent in South Texas gave me an opportunity to experience other aspects of Scott’s devotion to hunting.  Others always came first, especially sharing his hunting knowledge with his wife Darla and daughters Jessica and McKenna.  Scott also enjoyed spending quality time with his brother-in-law Brad Koenig, and Brad’s sons, Reagan and Nathan.  His excitement and face, beaming with pride as he recounted Jessica’s and Darla’s first buck, will stay forever etched in my memory.

 

            In addition to dedicating time to family and friends on the Schumann Ranch, Scott learned the art of management and conservation.  A strict and arduous feeding program along with self-imposed harvest rules created an opportunity to see and harvest above average deer for the size and location of the Schumann Ranch.  To recall an exact number of bags of corn and protein emptied into feeders is not possible; however, I always knew when the phone rang on Wednesday, it was time to head south.

 

My most prominent memory of Scott Roessing is one that will last forever.  Scott’s love of the outdoors drove him to dedicate countless hours to Buck Fever, Bass Fever, and the Seguin Outdoor Learning Center.  His many years of commitment and leadership within these organizations will ensure that thousands of local youth will have the opportunity to experience the great outdoors – a lasting legacy that all outdoor enthusiasts should strive to emulate.

 

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